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Home » Your Eye Health » Eye Diseases » Macular Degeneration » Forms of Macular Degeneration

Forms of Macular Degeneration

There are two forms of macular degeneration, dry (non-neovascular) or wet (neovascular). The term neovascular refers to the growth of new blood vessels.

Dry AMD (non-neovascular)

Dry AMD is the most common form of the disease, making up about 85%-90% of all cases of AMD. It is characterized by blurred central vision or blind spots, as the macula begins to deteriorate. Dry AMD is an early stage of the disease and is less severe than the wet form,.

Dry AMD occurs when the aging tissues of the macula begin to thin out and break down. Tiny pieces of white or yellowish protein called drusen begin to appear, which are thought to be deposits from the macular tissue as it deteriorates. The appearance of these drusen are often what leads to a diagnosis of AMD during an eye exam.

With dry AMD vision loss happens gradually, however, the dry form can progress to wet AMD rapidly. There is currently no cure for dry AMD, however there is research that shows that some people can benefit from supplemental vitamin therapy including antioxidants, lutein and zeaxanthin.

Wet AMD (neovascular)

Wet AMD is less common occurring in only about 10 percent of those with AMD. AMD is classified as Wet AMD when abnormal blood vessels begin to grow under the retina and leak fluid and blood into the macula, resulting in blind spots and a loss of central vision. Wet AMD can cause more damage to vision and permanent scarring if not treated quickly, so any sudden blur in vision should be assessed immediately, especially if one is aware that they have AMD. Usually vision loss happens faster and is more noticeable than in dry AMD so the quicker it is treated, the more vision you can preserve.

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Dear patients,

As your eye care professionals, your well-being is important to us! After careful consideration of the most recent recommendations of the CDC, AOA and FDA regarding the current COVID-19 situation, we feel that it is best for you, our team, and our community to limit our physical interactions with one another until the threat of the virus has passed. Therefore, we will be closing the office on Friday, March 20 at 12:00 noon and will remain closed until at least March 27, but most likely longer.

In the meantime, if you have a true ocular emergency, please call 850-216-2020 to reach the doctor on call. We will be doing our best to manage all urgent eye problems in such a manner as to limit any possible spread of the virus.

For those patients with appointments scheduled for the week of March 23, we will be calling to reschedule your appointments once we have a better estimate regarding when we will reopen. Because our schedule is already quite full for the next several weeks and because we realize that many of you have already waited several weeks for an appointment, we will be adding additional time slots to the weekly schedule as we attempt to accommodate each of you in a timely manner. We ask for your patience and your flexibility in this matter.

In addition, if it appears to still be reasonable, we plan to be open briefly on Wednesday, March 25 from 10:00am -12:00 pm to allow our patients to pick up any previously-ordered glasses and contact lenses. Please call the office when you arrive and we will deliver your eyewear to your car.

If you need to order contact lenses during this time please email the office at

contacts@tallahasseeeyecenter.com. Be sure to include your contact information and someone will reach out to you. We will do our best to monitor this email daily.

Online ordering is also available at www.tallahasseeeyecenter.com

We will be closely monitoring the situation and will notify you as soon as we make the decision to reopen. It is our hope that we will soon be on the other side of this situation and that our community will remain healthy and strong.

Stay well, Drs. Whaley, Strickland and Hough