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Home » Your Eye Health » Eye Diseases » Diabetes and Eyesight

Diabetes and Eyesight

Diabetes is a disease that affects the way we process food for energy and growth. With all forms of diabetes—type 1, type 2 and gestational diabetes—the body has trouble converting sugar in the blood into energy, resulting in a host of potential health problems.

Diabetes increases the likelihood that common diabetes-related vision problems or diseases might occur:

  • Diabetics are prone to developing cataracts (a clouding of the eye’s lens) at an earlier age.
  • People with diabetes are almost 50% more likely to develop glaucoma, an eye disorder that damages the optic nerve often marked by an increase of internal eye pressure.
  • Macular edema (and macular degeneration) are more common in diabetics due to malfunctioning blood vessels in the middle region of the retina responsible for central, sharp vision.
  • Most notably, diabetes can result in diabetic retinopathy; an eye disease that affects the blood vessels in the all-important retina. Nearly 45 percent of Americans diagnosed with diabetes have some stage of diabetic retinopathy.

That’s why there’s no separating diabetes and vision. If you have diabetes, then you should understand vision problems that increase in likelihood as a result of the disease.

Diabetes Statistics

Over 21 million people in the United States have diabetes, with an estimated additional 6 million people unaware they have a form of the disease. What’s more, an estimated 54 million Americans ages 40 to 74 have prediabetes, a condition that puts them at risk for developing type 2 diabetes. According to a recent American Optometric Association survey, diabetes is the leading cause of new cases of blindness among adults ages 20 to 74.

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Dear patients,

As your eye care professionals, your well-being is important to us! After careful consideration of the most recent recommendations of the CDC, AOA and FDA regarding the current COVID-19 situation, we feel that it is best for you, our team, and our community to limit our physical interactions with one another until the threat of the virus has passed. Therefore, we will be closing the office on Friday, March 20 at 12:00 noon and will remain closed until at least March 27, but most likely longer.

In the meantime, if you have a true ocular emergency, please call 850-216-2020 to reach the doctor on call. We will be doing our best to manage all urgent eye problems in such a manner as to limit any possible spread of the virus.

For those patients with appointments scheduled for the week of March 23, we will be calling to reschedule your appointments once we have a better estimate regarding when we will reopen. Because our schedule is already quite full for the next several weeks and because we realize that many of you have already waited several weeks for an appointment, we will be adding additional time slots to the weekly schedule as we attempt to accommodate each of you in a timely manner. We ask for your patience and your flexibility in this matter.

In addition, if it appears to still be reasonable, we plan to be open briefly on Wednesday, March 25 from 10:00am -12:00 pm to allow our patients to pick up any previously-ordered glasses and contact lenses. Please call the office when you arrive and we will deliver your eyewear to your car.

If you need to order contact lenses during this time please email the office at

contacts@tallahasseeeyecenter.com. Be sure to include your contact information and someone will reach out to you. We will do our best to monitor this email daily.

Online ordering is also available at www.tallahasseeeyecenter.com

We will be closely monitoring the situation and will notify you as soon as we make the decision to reopen. It is our hope that we will soon be on the other side of this situation and that our community will remain healthy and strong.

Stay well, Drs. Whaley, Strickland and Hough