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Ptosis

Ptosis is a pathological eye condition in which the eyelid falls or droops. It is a condition that can affect adults and children (although it is most common in the elderly) and the degree to which the eyelid droops can vary from barely noticeable to completely covering the pupil (the black spot in the middle of your eye that allows light to enter). Fortunately, there is treatment for the condition.

Symptoms and Signs of Ptosis

Ptosis can be identified by an abnormal drooping of one or both of the upper eyelids. When it only affects one lid, you can notice that the two lids are not in alignment. Often an individual with ptosis will tilt their head backward or raise their eyebrows to see more clearly, which can eventually result in headaches or neck issues. Sometimes when the eyelid droops below the pupil, it is accompanied by obscured vision or causes other eye and vision problems.

What Causes Ptosis?

In adults, ptosis is most frequently a condition related to aging when the muscles responsible for controlling the eyelid, called the levator muscles, become weakened. Ptosis can also be a result of an eye injury or an after-effect of certain types of eye surgery.

In children, ptosis can be a congenital condition in which the levator muscles do not develop properly. If not treated this can lead to problems with the development with the child’s visual system and may cause amblyopia (lazy eye), astigmatism or strabismus (crossed eyes).

Treatment for Ptosis

Prior to a treatment plan, your doctor will complete a comprehensive eye exam along with some other tests to determine the cause of the ptosis. While the treatment does depend on the cause of the condition, surgery to repair the eyelid function is the most common treatment.

The surgical procedure, called blepharoplasty, repairs the levator muscle of the eyelid or attaches the lid to other muscles that can lift the eye (such as the forehead). In mild cases, small adjustments might be made to repair the muscle while other times additional procedures might be done such as removing some of the skin from the lid. The surgeon will determine what needs to be done to tighten the levator muscles or otherwise return the eyelids to their normal position. As with any surgical procedure there are risks to this surgery and in the most serious cases, movement may not return fully or at all to the eyelids.

In children, surgery is usually recommended to avoid potential or existing vision problems. This may come along with additional treatment for amblyopia or strabismus to strengthen the weak eye such as wearing an eye patch, eyeglasses or using eye drops. Any child diagnosed with ptosis will need to have regular evaluations with an eye doctor to monitor the condition and the child’s vision.
If you suspect you or a loved one may have ptosis, try looking at some old pictures to see if there is a noticeable change and of course make an appointment with your eye doctor as soon as possible to assess if there is a problem.

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Dear patients,

As your eye care professionals, your well-being is important to us! After careful consideration of the most recent recommendations of the CDC, AOA and FDA regarding the current COVID-19 situation, we feel that it is best for you, our team, and our community to limit our physical interactions with one another until the threat of the virus has passed. Therefore, we will be closing the office on Friday, March 20 at 12:00 noon and will remain closed until at least March 27, but most likely longer.

In the meantime, if you have a true ocular emergency, please call 850-216-2020 to reach the doctor on call. We will be doing our best to manage all urgent eye problems in such a manner as to limit any possible spread of the virus.

For those patients with appointments scheduled for the week of March 23, we will be calling to reschedule your appointments once we have a better estimate regarding when we will reopen. Because our schedule is already quite full for the next several weeks and because we realize that many of you have already waited several weeks for an appointment, we will be adding additional time slots to the weekly schedule as we attempt to accommodate each of you in a timely manner. We ask for your patience and your flexibility in this matter.

In addition, if it appears to still be reasonable, we plan to be open briefly on Wednesday, March 25 from 10:00am -12:00 pm to allow our patients to pick up any previously-ordered glasses and contact lenses. Please call the office when you arrive and we will deliver your eyewear to your car.

If you need to order contact lenses during this time please email the office at

contacts@tallahasseeeyecenter.com. Be sure to include your contact information and someone will reach out to you. We will do our best to monitor this email daily.

Online ordering is also available at www.tallahasseeeyecenter.com

We will be closely monitoring the situation and will notify you as soon as we make the decision to reopen. It is our hope that we will soon be on the other side of this situation and that our community will remain healthy and strong.

Stay well, Drs. Whaley, Strickland and Hough